University of Georgia




University of Georgia


In 1916, the (Georgia) State College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts offered the first two years of a proposed four-year course leading to a doctor of veterinary medicine degree. The program was interrupted in 1917 when the US became involved in World War I, but a formal four-year program began in 1918.  The degree program ended after the graduation of the Class of 1933; a total of 67 men had received DVM degrees in Georgia.

Following the close of World War II, the University of Georgia enrolled a number of veterans under the GI Bill, many of whom wished to pursue degrees in veterinary medicine. The UGA School of Veterinary Medicine was established in 1946. Forty-four men and one woman graduated four years later from a newly AVMA-accredited UGA SVM. In 1970, the School became a College.

Through the decades, the UGA CVM has made multiple contributions to veterinary education, to the health and wellbeing of the state’s agricultural and domestic animals, to its wildlife, and to people in general via our innovations in the realm of translational medicine. Highlights include:


Vaccines, therapeutics and other discoveries:

  • Development of multiple vaccines and vaccine technologies for the poultry industry (for Marek’s disease, 1970; reovirus, 1985; CholervacPM©, PM ONEVAX©, both for fowl cholera, and Avinew©, for Newcastle Disease, all between 1990-92; development of the modified Pastuerella multocida for use in fowl cholera vaccines, patented 1995; for Mycoplasma gallisepticum, in 2010; for Infectious Bronchitis Virus, 2014).
  • Development of Restasis®, one of the first therapies for use in animals subsequently approved for use in humans. (Patented 1987; released for humans, by Allergan, in 2003.)
  • Development of the “MerMade” synthesizer for DNA and RNA, 1994.
  • Development of a molecular test for Avian Infectious Bronchitis Virus (developed early 1990s, patented 2000) to rapidly detect IBV in poultry.
  • Delivery of and initial medical care for the world’s first calf cloned from cells of a slaughtered cow (by Caesarian, 2002).
  • The National Geographic and UGA Kitty Cam Project of 2009 explored the lives of Athens-area indoor-outdoor cats. Among the researchers surprising findings: Only 44 percent of the 60 cats in the study stalked, chased or killed other animals during the day.
  • Development of Silvion® and SilvaKlense®, antibacterial skin and wound treatments approved for use in humans (2003).
  • Development of a synthesized PIV5 with unique characteristics that make PIV5 an efficient vector for vaccine delivery (recent; patent pending).
  • Two significant research awards from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop enhanced poliovirus vaccine cell lines (in 2011) and rotovirus vaccine cell lines (in 2013).
  • The first CVM to use adult stem cells in a feline renal transplantation to optimize the patient’s acceptance of the new kidney (2013; second procedure in 2014).

The scholarship of veterinary teaching

  • Since 1948, we have served as a regional SVM/CVM serving students from multiple states. We currently admit regional students from Georgia, South Carolina and Delaware.
  • The first veterinary institution in the US to offer a continuing education program (1963).
  • Establishing the Educational Resources Unit (1970), which creates teaching materials in use at many institutions, including “The Glass Horse” and related projects, various iBooks, etc.
  • Text books from our faculty that have become the gold-standard in veterinary education:
  1.  “Veterinary Laboratory Medicine,” by Drs. Robert J. Duncan and Keith Prasse (first edition 1977)
  2. “Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the Dog and Cat,” by Dr. Craig E. Greene (first edition 1984)
  • The first Master of Avian Medicine program in the US (1970).
  • The first use of the Problem-Oriented Medical Record in veterinary education (1970).
  • The first elective courses offered in fish health management and pet bird medicine (1972).
  • Clinical training for veterinary technician students from AVMA-accredited programs in Georgia (since 1975).
  • The first to host the Merial-NIH National Veterinary Scholars Symposium (2000).
  • The first Certificate in International Veterinary Medicine program (2000).
  • The first continuing education program for members of the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps involved in Stability Operations overseas (established 2010). The course is now mandatory for Army veterinarians who wish to deploy overseas.

Facility development and Research infrastructure:

  • The Georgia Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories in Tifton (est. 1945) and Athens (est. 1972).
  • The first veterinary isolation units in the Southeast (added to Tifton facility in 1954).
  • The Poultry Disease Research Center (opened 1957; first diagnostic service est. 1948).
  • The Institute of Comparative Medicine (opened 1973).
  • Established one of the first Veterinary Medical Experiment Stations at a CVM (est. 1973).
  • The UGA Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (1998), formed to promote interdisciplinary research, education and service related to tropical and emerging infectious diseases.
  • The Animal Health Research Center (opened 2006), a freestanding biocontainment research facility with the capacity to support up to BSL3-Ag research. The AHRC is among a handful of facilities in the US that can support up to BSL3-Ag research.
  • A new Veterinary Medical Learning Center, to include new hospital and new classroom building, is scheduled to open March 2015 (current UGA VTH opened 1979).

Disease surveillance/response:

  • The Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study has been monitoring diseases in wildlife since 1957. Today, SCWDS works with 19-member states.
  • A partner in the Emory-UGA Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, funded by the NIAID (since 2007).
  • Researchers at the UGA CVM (and The Ohio State University) partner with Zoo Atlanta and other collaborators to launch the Great Ape Heart Project (funded in 2010) to study cardiovascular disease in captive apes. The project is led by and based at Zoo Atlanta.
  • The Georgia Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories in Athens and Tifton have participated in the FDA’s Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (Vet-LRN), which conducts the surveillance program for Salmonella in pet foods, since its inception in 2011.
  • The Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory was among the three labs to identify the dolphin morbillivirus outbreak in the Atlantic in 2013.

Community service:

  • Veterinary support for the equestrian events at the 1996 Summer Olympics.
  • Spearheaded development of the Universal Veterinary Information System, or UVIS, for use in diagnostic laboratories and hospitals (copyrighted 2001).
  • Development of VetView, a browser-based records software for use in diagnostic laboratories and hospitals (launched 2010).
  • Vets for Pets and People (launched 2009), a program designed to raise awareness among veterinarians in Georgia about the link between animal abuse and domestic violence.



  • 1916    The (Georgia) State College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts offers the first two years of a proposed four-year course leading to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree. Eight students enrolled in the class, but in 1917 the program was interrupted when the United States became involved in World War I.
  • 1918    A formal four-year program, known as the Division of Veterinary Medicine, is implemented in the State College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts.
  • 1933    The Division of Veterinary Medicine is discontinued after the class of 1933 graduates. Sixty-seven men received DVM degrees between 1921 and 1933. The program was ended after the University System of Higher Education was re-organized, and it was  recommended that Georgia appropriate $350,000 per year to support the program.
  • 1945    The Department of Animal Diseases, the forerunner of the Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory, is established on March 1 in a small space in the Animal Science Building at the Coastal Plain Agricultural Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia.
  • 1946    The University of Georgia School of Veterinary Medicine is founded in response to continued interest in re-establishing an accredited veterinary school in Georgia, and also in response to the number of World War II veterans enrolled at UGA under the GI Bill who wanted to pursue an education in veterinary medicine.
  • 1948    UGA SVM becomes a regional school of veterinary medicine and begins admitting out-of-state students, under a plan administered by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB). Under this agreement, the SVM admitted students from South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland. (Today, in addition to accepting students from Georgia, the UGA CVM accepts regional students from South Carolina and Delaware.)
  • Dr. Clifford Barber, in the Department of Pathology and Parasitology, launches a poultry diagnostic service.
  • 1950    On May 18, the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education granted accreditation status to the UGA SVM. The accreditation came just in time for the SVM’s first graduating seniors — 44 men and one woman — to quality for state licensing exams.
  • The first Annual Report of the School of Veterinary Medicine, dated June 1, 1950, notes that the North Georgia Poultry Improvement Association headquarters in Gainesville, Georgia, provided $1,500 to the SVM for research. This is the earliest recorded reference to a research award made to the SVM.
  • 1951    The first building constructed to house the Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory opens in Tifton, Georgia. It was paid for with a $50,000 appropriation from Georgia and $22,000 from the Board of Regents.
  • 1952    An air-sac problem in poultry helps boost veterinary research at the SVM, and affiliates the SVM with the Agricultural Experiment Station. By 1955, eight faculty members would be actively engaged in research and four others in clinical and field studies on new drugs.
  • 1954    Isolation units are added to the veterinary diagnostic laboratory building in Tifton, Georgia. During this time, these are the only isolation units available in the South.
  • 1957    The UGA SVM is selected by the Southeastern Association of Game and Fish Commissioners as the site for the Southeastern Cooperative Deer Diseases Study, which was later renamed the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, or SCWDS. Today, SCWDS works with several federal agencies and the wildlife management agencies of 19 states to provide diagnostic services, consultation, disease surveillance and research on a national and international basis where diseases may be transmitted between wildlife, domestic animals, and humans.
  • In response to Georgia’s rapidly growing poultry industry, the poultry diagnostic service launched by Dr. Clifford Barber in 1948 is expanded to become the Poultry Disease Research Center. The facility, which included a diagnostic laboratory, opened in November 1957.  The Center’s early research priorities included: control procedures for fowl cholera, including vaccine development; chronic respiratory disease and allied respiratory infections of poultry; the influence and control of microbial factors on hatchability and chick livability. Now known as the Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center (PDRC), it serves poultry producers worldwide.  PDRC was administered by the Agricultural Experiment Station of the College of Agriculture until the fall of 1968, when its administration was transferred to the SVM.
  • 1963    Dr. J. T. Mercer (DVM ’50) returns to the SVM faculty to become director of continuing education, the first CE program of its kind in the United States. In May 1964, the SVM offered its First Annual Conference for Veterinarians, held at the Georgia Center, which was attended by 93 veterinarians from 13 states.
  • Congress appropriates funds to research and monitor diseases in wildlife in 13 Southeastern states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study (SCWDS), first established in 1957 as the Southeastern Cooperative Deer Diseases Study, expands its mission to fill this need.
  • A separate Department of Veterinary Extension is formed within the Cooperative Extension Service of the College of Agriculture; its reach includes poultry and other species. Dr. Charles Dobbins is appointed to head this department, a capacity in which he served for 29 years.
  • Dr. Frank Boyd, a bacteriologist at the Poultry Disease Research Center, receives a $34,690 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the relationship between poultry nutrition and infections in chickens.
  • 1964    Dr. Fred C. Davison (DVM ’52) leaves his post as assistant director of the Division of Scientific Activities of the American Veterinary Medical Association to become the second dean of the UGA SVM. Dr. Davison made veterinary research a top priority at the SVM. In 1966, Davison became vice-chancellor of the Board of Regents, and in 1967 became president of the University of Georgia; he led UGA for 19 years. In 1986, he resigned as president of UGA and returned to his academic home in the Department of Pathology, where he became the first occupant of the Fred C. Davison Chair of Veterinary Medicine, endowed in his honor.
  • 1967    The administration of the Animal Disease Laboratory at Tifton, Georgia, is transferred from the Coastal Plains Experiment Station to the School of Veterinary Medicine. A new laboratory, consisting of approximately 15,000 square feet and costing about $400,000 to build, was added to the facility in 1966. Today, this laboratory is known as the Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory. Because of the cooperation between the Tifton faculty and regulatory officials, and also the development of the rapid fluorescent antibody procedure for identifying viruses, hog cholera was eradicated in Georgia (along with the rest of the U.S.) by the early 1970s.
  • 1968    Administration for the Poultry Disease Research Center (PDRC) is transferred to the SVM. At the same time, the Georgia Poultry Improvement Association awards the SVM a $138,000 grant — one of the largest grants awarded to a university during this time — to research avian leukosis.
  • 1970    The Board of Regents approves changing the name of the SVM to the College of Veterinary Medicine, in response to the school’s expanded graduate, research and service programs.
  • The College receives a $131,000 grant from the Department of Health Education, and Welfare for the improvement of veterinary medical education, and uses the funds to establish the Educational Resources Center (ERC). Today, ERC functions as an in-house graphic arts firm providing medical illustration, animation, photography and graphic arts services for use at the UGA CVM, the University at-large, as well as for outside clients. In the late 1990s, members of ERC worked with UGA CVM equine veterinarians to create “The Glass Horse,” a 3-D animation designed to help veterinary students visualize the inside of a horse. “The Glass Horse” led to a series of similar projects, and helped position the UGA CVM as a leader in 3-D educational materials. ERC continues to create 3-D and web-based learning tools. In 2014, it began offering a yearlong certificate in comparative medical illustration program for illustrators who have obtained a master’s degree in medical illustration from one of the four accredited training programs in North America.
  • The non-thesis Master of Avian Medicine degree program is approved, which provides specialized training in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of poultry diseases. The program is the first-of-its kind in veterinary colleges in North America.
  • Researchers at PDRC and the CVM develop an effective vaccine against Marek’s disease, saving Georgia’s poultry industry an estimated $28 million annually.
  • The Department of Medicine and Surgery begins to accept interns, paving the way for training programs in clinical specialties. In 1973, the department launched a residency program in medicine; it launched a residency program in surgery in 1974.
  • In the early 1970s, the CVM’s small animal clinic becomes the first veterinary unit in the United States to adopt the problem-oriented medical record system for teaching and patient care, which allowed regular faculty evaluation and feedback on student performance. Use of the POMR has since been adopted by most veterinary colleges in North America.
  • 1972    The Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory is established in July to serve the needs of livestock and pet owners in North Georgia.
  • The CVM introduced its core curriculum-elective program for fourth-year students, which called for each student to utilize one half of the year for proficiency training in the four main clinical areas (food animal medicine and surgery, equine medicine and surgery, small animal medicine, small animal surgery), and to utilize the remaining half-year for training in electives. The elective courses offered included fish health management and pet bird medicine — both first-of-their-kind courses in veterinary curricula.
  • 1973    A new wing of the CVM is opened in January and occupied by the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology. The facility, called the Institute of Comparative Medicine (ICM), was constructed for about $1.6 million, with funding provided by the state and a grant from the National Institutes of Health. The ICM — designed to expand the CVM’s interdisciplinary research enterprise in the area of comparative medicine — helped position the CVM as a research institute in the realm of One Health.
  • 1975    The Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (AVDL) receives provisional accreditation by the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, becoming the ninth laboratory to receive this accreditation. The lab became fully accredited when it moved to a new building in 1979. The need for the lab continued to grow, and in 2001 the AVDL moved into its current facility, located on the main CVM campus.
  • The small animal clinic accepted its first class of animal technician students to train in clinical areas for six months; the students came from a program at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, launched in September 1974. In 1976, an animal technician program began at Fort Valley State College, and the CVM entered into a similar training agreement for their technician students. Today, the UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital continues to train veterinary technician students from Fort Valley State College, and also from Athens Technical College.
  • 1976    State funding for the Veterinary Medical Experiment Station (VMES), which had been approved by the Board of Regents in 1973 to provide a focus for domestic animal disease research, became available for the first time on July 1, 1976. Funding for VMES came as a line item from the state’s legislature and totaled $526,000 for Fiscal Year 1977. The amount included $316,000 for animal disease research and $210,000 for research on poultry diseases. Research funds from extramural sources for that year totaled $758,000. The total level of support enabled the UGA CVM to initiate or continue research on 80 projects representing a variety of animal diseases.
  • 1977    The first edition of “Veterinary Laboratory Medicine,” by Robert J. Duncan, DVM, PhD, DACVP, and Keith Prasse, DVM, PhD, DACVP, is released by Iowa State University Press. Drs. Duncan and Prasse met as graduate students, in the late 1960s, at Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Both were intensely interested in the then-emerging field of veterinary clinical pathology. Duncan joined the faculty at UGA CVM in 1969 and Prasse joined the faculty in 1972. Their first textbook grew out of a series of lectures, intermittent printed notes, and ultimately a loosely bound series of course notes that the two created for a class they taught in clinical pathology to sophomore veterinary students at the UGA CVM. Clinical pathology was not recognized as a specialty by the American College of Veterinary Pathology until 1972. Both Drs. Duncan and Prasse took their specialty boards in 1973 and passed. Their textbook is now in its fifth edition. The pair was recognized in 2010 with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.
  • 1978     The CVM purchases approximately 90 acres of land, located at the intersection of College Station and Barnett Shoals roads, from the College of Agriculture. The location is home to a new veterinary teaching hospital and classroom building, both currently under construction. The new campus is slated to open in March 2015.
  • The Emergency Programs of Veterinary Services, a division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), enters into a cooperative agreement with SCWDS for the purpose of integrating wildlife disease surveillance capabilities into established domestic animal health programs and to assist with wildlife aspects of animal disease emergencies. This agreement, which helped propel SCWDS to a worldwide role in wildlife disease surveillance, resulted from the USDA’s recruitment of SCWDS to determine the role of wild birds (as reservoirs or disseminators of disease) during the 1972-73 exotic Newcastle disease eradication campaign.
  • 1979    In September, the CVM opens a new hospital for both small and large animals. The facility also includes 2 auditoriums, 11 conference rooms, offices for clinical faculty, 20 research laboratories, and a reading room/autotutorial center. It was built with $7,750,000 in funding from the state for construction and equipment, plus $150,000 in donations from UGA CVM alumni and friends to provide furnishings for the reading room, autotutorial center and conference rooms. This hospital space will be renovated following the opening of the new UGA Veterinary Medical Learning Center, currently under construction and slated to open in March 2015.
  • 1984 “Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the Dog and Cat,” written by Craig E. Greene, DVM, MS, DACVIM, is released by Elsevier. Greene joined the UGA CVM faculty in 1976 and became known worldwide as an expert in small animal infectious diseases. His textbook, now in its fourth edition and entitled “Infectious Diseases of the Dog & Cat,” is considered by many as the “Bible” of infectious diseases for veterinarians. Dr. Greene retired from the CVM in 2006; from 1995 until his retirement, he held the endowed Edward H. Gunst Professorship.
  • 1985    A UGA CVM veterinary ophthalmologist develops a prescription drug to treat chronic dry-eye in dogs. The drug, Optimmune® (approved for veterinary use in 1995), is subsequently approved for use in treating humans with chronic dry-eye, and released (by Allergan) in 2003 under the name Restasis® (both versions of the drug were patented in 1987). Restasis® is now marketed (to human patients) in more than 35 countries. This is one of the first medicines developed for veterinary use that was later tested and approved for use in humans.
  • Researchers at the UGA Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center develop and patent a vaccine for reovirus.
  • 1990-1992    Three vaccines developed at the UGA Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center are patented and released on the market: Cholervac PM© and PM ONEVAX©, both used to protect against fowl cholera, and Avinew©, which protects against Newcastle Disease.
  • 1994    Royal A. McGraw, MS, PhD, a professor of physiology and pharmacology in the CVM, patents the “MerMade,” which synthesizes DNA and RNA.
  • 1995    Researchers at the UGA Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center patent their successfully modified Pasteurella multocida strain, designed for use in vaccines for fowl cholera. Lead inventors are John R. Glisson, DVM, MAM, PhD, and Charles L. Hofacre, MS, DVM, MAM, PhD, both professors of avian medicine at the CVM. (Glisson served as head of the PDRC from 2003 until his retirement in 2011.)
  • 1996    UGA equine veterinarians and the UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital provide support for the equestrian events of the 1996 Summer Olympics, hosted by Atlanta.
  • Dean David Anderson retires on June 30, after serving 21 years as dean and 27 at the University of Georgia. At the time of his retirement, Dr. Anderson had the distinction of being the dean with the greatest longevity at UGA as well as among all veterinary colleges in North America. The David P. Anderson Fellowship was established in his honor to support a veterinarian studying toward a PhD degree in avian medicine, as Dr. Anderson first served the CVM as director of the Poultry Disease Research Center when he joined UGA in 1969.
  • 1997    An endowment is established by the University of Georgia and the Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) to support an eminent scholar in animal health vaccine development. Ralph A. Tripp, PhD, joined the CVM in 2005 as its first GRA Eminent Scholar and the GRA Chair of Animal Health Vaccine Development. Tripp, a professor in the CVM’s Department of Infectious Diseases, is based at the CVM’s biocontainment facility, the Animal Health Research Center.
  • 1998    The Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD) is established at the University of Georgia to promote interdisciplinary research, education and service related to tropical and emerging infectious diseases. The CTEGD is comprised of faculty from eight departments in four UGA colleges, including the Department of Infectious Diseases within the CVM. The CTEGD is home to a wide range of research programs, but most focus on protozoan and metazoan parasites, their hosts and their vectors. The Center’s work includes a number of internationally based research programs that combine research conducted at the University of Georgia with on-site studies.
  • 2000    UGA CVM hosts the first Merial-NIH National Veterinary Scholars Symposium.
  • PDRC researchers Mark Jackwood and H.M. Kwon patent their Differentiation of Avian Infectious Bronchitis Virus Serotypes, a molecular test developed during the early 1990s to rapidly identify infectious bronchitis virus in poultry. The test revolutionized the surveillance process for IBV in poultry, and is still vital to the industry today. “We went from being able to type three or four viruses a year to being able to identify and type 10 or more viruses in a day,” said Jackwood, MS, PhD, who is now director of the Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center and head of the CVM’s Department of Population Health.
  • In late 2000, the UGA CVM launched its Certificate in International Veterinary Medicine program, designed to help the CVM’s students, faculty and administrators make meaningful contributions to the understanding of international veterinary medicine and the inter-relatedness of animal health globally. The program was the first of its kind among veterinary colleges in the United States.
  • 2001    The Universal Veterinary Information System, or UVIS, is copyrighted by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). UVIS — used by roughly one-third of the veterinary colleges in North America as of 2010 — was developed by the Ross Group, Inc., for the UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital and the Georgia Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories. When its initial contract with UGARF expired in fall 2010, the UGA CVM began to develop and market a newer, browser-based version of UVIS now known as VetView (http://www.vetview.org/). Today, VetView is used in the veterinary hospitals and diagnostic laboratories at the University of Georgia, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, the Université de Montréal, Kansas State University, North Carolina State University, and Cornell University.
  • 2002    Large animal veterinarians at the UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital deliver by Caesarean section the first calf cloned from cells of a slaughtered cow. Born on April 22, “KC” was named after the kidney cell from which she was cloned. KC was created by Steven L. Stice, PhD, a professor and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the department of Animal and Dairy Science at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
  • 2003    UGA CVM researchers file for a patent on Tricide®, which is designed to inhibit the growth of microorganisms at the site of a wound or burn, and to promote healing and reduction in the sensation of pain. In 2004, the product was approved by the FDA for professional use in humans; this version is marketed as Silvion® and has a companion product, SilvaKlense® (an antibacterial skin and wound cleanser). The technology is based on research conducted by the Emerging Diseases Research Group at the UGA Infectious Diseases Laboratory, based within the Department of Small Animal Medicine. Professors Richard Wooley, DVM, PhD, who is now retired, and Branson Ritchie, DVM, MS, PhD, DABVP, ECAMS, led the research and development team. Related products are in development.
  • 2005    The UGA CVM establishes a dual-degree DVM/PhD program designed to enhance the career development of students with an interest in science, veterinary research and who wish to pursue both degrees concurrently. Sabrina McGraw is the first student accepted into the program. Dr. McGraw became the first graduate from the program in summer 2011. Students in the UGA CVM’s DVM/PhD program may apply for a scholarship and/or loan, for which funds are available through an endowment. The Dorothy and Thomas Morris Scholarship was established by a gift from the couple’s estate. Both dedicated cat lovers who adopted many strays, the couple decided to donate their entire estate to fund scholarships for veterinary education. Tom Morris said he chose UGA CVM “… because it was the finest in the country.”
  • 2006    The CVM opens its state-of-the-art Animal Health Research Center (AHRC), a 75,000-square-foot biocontainment research facility with the capacity to support high-containment research up to BSL-3-Ag (federal biosafety level 3 agricultural research). Today, the AHRC is one of about 7 BSL-3-Ag facilities in the United States, and remains one of 3 BSL-3-Ag facilities on a university campus that is dedicated solely to research in large animals.
  • The UGA CVM establishes a dual-degree DVM/MPH program designed as a five-year program for students interested in science, veterinary medicine, and a career in public health. Dr. Elizabeth Lauren Atkins, the first student accepted into the program, became the first to graduate from it in fall 2007.
  • 2007     Since 2007, researchers at SCWDS and the UGA CVM’s Animal Health Research Center (in partnership with Emory University) have been among a handful of institutions in the US to be funded by the NIH as a Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS). The Emory-UGA CEIRS program was funded again in 2014 for another seven years by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).
  • 2009    The Vets for Pets and People project is launched by students, with support from faculty. The program works with veterinarians throughout Georgia to heighten awareness about the link between animal abuse and domestic violence. The program was named “Advocate of the Year for 2010” by the Domestic Violence Task Force of Athens-Clarke and Oconee Counties.
  • The National Geographic and UGA Kitty Cam Project of 2009 explored the lives of Athens-area indoor-outdoor cats. Among the researchers surprising findings: Only 44 percent of the 60 cats in the study stalked, chased or killed other animals during the day. The research was led by Sonia Hernandez, DVM, PhD, DAZCM, an associate professor of wildlife disease and ecology who is jointly appointed to the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources and the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, based at the UGA CVM; and, Kerrie Anne Loyd, MA, PhD, who completed her PhD in wildlife ecology and management in 2012.
  • 2010    A vaccine for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (which causes chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in other fowl) developed at the UGA Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center is licensed to a company based in Japan. The vaccine was developed by Stanley H. Kleven, DVM, PhD, DACVM, DACVP, now retired, and Naola Ferguson-Noel, PhD, MAM, DVM, an associate professor of avian medicine.
  • Researchers at the UGA CVM (and The Ohio State University) partner with Zoo Atlanta and other key collaborators to launch the Great Ape Heart Project (funded in 2010 by a National Leadership Planning Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services) to study cardiovascular disease in captive apes. The project is led by and based at Zoo Atlanta; primary partners on the study are UGA and OSU; key collaborators are based at more than 75 institutions throughout North America. The project’s goal is to design a coordinated national program to investigate ape heart disease and establish uniform, state-of-the-art cardiac disease diagnostics, treatment and prevention strategies for great ape heart disease.
  • Corrie Brown, DVM, PhD, DACVP, works with the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps to develop a continuing education program to provide additional training to members of the Corps involved in Stability Operations overseas. Dr. Brown is a professor of anatomic pathology and an expert in the pathogenesis of disease in food-producing animals and creating diagnostic infrastructure in developing nations. The first course was held in 2010. The course is now mandatory for all Army veterinarians who wish to deploy overseas.
  • 2011    The Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory join the FDA’s Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (Vet-LRN), launched in 2011 to conduct the surveillance program for Salmonella in pet foods.
  • A research team led by Ralph Tripp, PhD, is one of roughly 85 Grand Challenges Explorations Round 6 grants awarded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The project — which is a partnership between the University of Georgia, Thermo Fisher Scientific and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — is to develop an enhances poliovirus vaccine cell line by silencing non-essential host genes. The team was awarded Phase II funding from the Gates Foundation in fall 2013 to use their technology to develop high-performance rotavirus vaccine cell lines capable of sustained vaccine production at increased titers. Dr. Tripp is a professor of infectious diseases, a Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) Eminent Scholar, and holds the GRA Chair of Animal Health Vaccine Development.
  • 2013    The Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory played a key role in identifying the dolphin morbillivirus that caused the “unusual mortality event” for bottlenose dolphins declared by the National Oceania and Atmospheric Administration during summer 2013. The Athens lab is one of three in the US equipped to identify morbillivirus at the molecular level.
  • Dr. Chad Schmiedt, an associate professor of soft tissue surgery and head of the UGA CVM’s feline renal transplantation program, uses adult stem cells in a feline renal transplantation to optimize the patient’s acceptance of the new kidney (2013). The Mesenchymal Stem cells are grown in the Regenerative Medicine Laboratory headed by Dr. John Peroni, an associate professor of large animal medicine whose research focus is in stem cell therapeutics. A second feline renal transplantation utilizing MSCs is performed in May 2014 on a cat named Arthur.
  • 2014    The University of Georgia and Merial jointly receive the 2014 Phoenix Award from the Metro Atlanta Chamber. The award recognized Merial’s university-wide partnership, including the many ways in which Merial has partnered with the UGA CVM since 1985. The UGA-Merial partnership has produced over 100 formal collaborations ranging from exchange of materials to sponsored research and license agreements. Four commercial poultry vaccines based on UGA technologies have generated over $2M in royalty revenue thus far. The Phoenix Awards are presented annually by the Metro Atlanta Chamber Bioscience Leadership Council in conjunction with the Georgia Bio to recognize the year’s best collaboration between an academic institution and a company that has made an outstanding contribution to the growth of Georgia’s bioscience industry.
  • An Infectious Bronchitis Virus vaccine developed by researchers at the UGA Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center is patented and licensed to Zoetis and other animal health companies for production and broad distribution. The vaccine, which has been used by three Georgia-based poultry companies to protect flocks in Georgia and the Southeast, was developed by Holly Sellers, MS, PhD, and Mark Jackwood, MS, PhD. Sellers is a professor of avian medicine; Jackwood is the director of the PDRC and head of the CVM’s Department of Population Health. Poultry is one of Georgia’s most important industries, with an estimated economic impact of $28 billion; the industry contributes more than 100,000 jobs in Georgia.
  • The UGA CVM’s Educational Resources Unit, founded in 1970, launches a yearlong certificate program in comparative medical illustration for illustrators who have obtained a master’s degree in medical illustration from one of the four accredited training programs in North America.
  • Biao He, PhD, has developed a synthesized PIV5 with unique characteristics that make PIV5 an efficient vector for vaccine delivery (recent; patent pending); for use in humans and animals. In vivo immunity demonstrated against: RSV, HIV, Influenza A virus. In vivo proof-of-concept studies in final stages for: rabies, canine influenza, and swine flu. Dr. He is a professor of infectious diseases, a Georgia Research Alliance Distinguished Investigator, and the Fred C. Davison Distinguished University Chair in Veterinary Medicine.
  • 2015    In March 2015, the UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital will move to its new location, 2.7 miles from the current CVM campus, along with third- and fourth-year students, all clinical faculty and some support services. The working title for this new campus has been the UGA Veterinary Medical Learning Center. The new facility, constructed for about $100 million from state funding and private donations, will enable the CVM to slowly grow its DVM class sizes and to provide a state-of-the-art facility, including state-of-the-art medical equipment, to its students and clients.

Find a Veterinary School Near You! Tuesday, November 21, 2017

AAVMC Reports Applicant Pool for Veterinary College Up 6% Over Last Year

read more Friday, September 8, 2017

AAVMC Accepting Award Nominations

read more Thursday, August 17, 2017

Nelson Installed as AAVMC President, U.S. Deans Gather During Summer Meeting

read more Monday, August 14, 2017

Pakistan's UVAS, United Arab Emirates University Join AAVMC as Affiliates

read more Journal of Veterinary Medical Education